Noticias de Tecnologia en Ingles

DBMS Legacies are Very Sticky

21 Dec 2014 15:24:11 Z

Donald Feinberg (@Brazingo) & Merv Adrian (@merv)

Every so often, there?s a wave of interest in the ?imminent retirement? of one or more legacy database management systems (DBMS). Usually, it?s because someone with very little knowledge of the actual use and distribution of the products becomes enthusiastic about someone?s sales pitch, or an anecdote or two. Sometimes it?s the result of a ?replacement? marketing campaign by a competitor. It takes longer than 40 years for DBMS technology to die, and for a (competing) marketer, it is like the villain in a horror story who just keeps coming back. And so far, it?s usually as illusive- and as far off – as the ?death of the mainframe?.

Recently, a financial analyst report stated that in 2015, the industry would begin retiring Sybase products (owned now by SAP) and Informix (owned now by IBM). We and our colleagues have since had several inquiries about this and our response is simple: poppycock. DBMS market data, and our thousands of interactions with customers, do not support any such assertions.

Let?s start with Sybase, or specifically, SAP ASE and SAP IQ, acquired by SAP from Sybase in 2010. (Full disclosure: Merv worked at Sybase in the 1990s.)

Since its acquisition of Sybase, SAP has released several enhanced versions of both SAP ASE and SAP IQ (including recently in 2014), and there?s no reason to question its intent to continue development and support of both.

Generally, the customers using these products are happy, and are not looking to replace them. We receive a steady stream inquires from Gartner clients asking about them, which have not changed in character or in volume. It is true that customers ask the question, however the vendor’s intent is not questioned. They are not typically or disproportionally about removing these products, though we regularly get inquiries about replacing all the ?legacy? RDBMS offerings with new products.

SAP IQ is the oldest and most widely installed column-store DBMS on the market. It is used for both analytics and as a general purpose data warehouse; it?s also part of the SAP HANA infrastructure, used as a near-line storage engine for cooler data not required in-memory in SAP HANA.

SAP ASE has retained a sizable loyal customer base on Wall Street, where it is part of the infrastructure used for trading systems, and elsewhere. It?s been certified as a DBMS platform for SAP Applications for about two years, and its use there is growing: Gartner estimates over 6000 instances of SAP Applications using SAP ASE as a platform at the beginning of 2014 [Edited Dec 19 to change number to 6000 - see below for comment from SAP]. That rate of growth for SAP ASE is actually faster than it had been in the 10 years before SAP acquired it – most likely because now SAP ASE is an alternative to Oracle, as a platform for SAP Applications.

Given the SAP sales force?s focus on SAP HANA, and the minimal marketing of SAP ASE and SAP IQ, we do understand how a misconception around the future of these products could happen. But it is just that ? a misconception.

What about Informix, acquired by IBM in 2001? Over a decade later, it remains an integral part of an IBM information management portfolio that includes three primary DBMSs ? DB2, IMS and Informix, and newer entrants such as Cloudant. IBM has continued to release new enhanced versions of Informix since the acquisition; for example it has recently added JSON support with MongoDB JSON Drivers. Due to the implementation of embedded indexes, Informix is a good choice for audio and video indexing. Finally, the number of IBM Informix customers has continued to increase and its user base is very loyal, with one the largest and most active User Groups.

IBM positions Informix for three primary use cases:

  • High-speed processing in verticals like retail (point of sale systems) and manufacturing
  • Time-series DBMS ? one of its primary features, and a ?timely? one
  • The Internet of Things, where its high-speed ingest capabilities and small footprint are well-suited

So, it?s our opinion that the report referenced above is erroneous, and is not based in fact. At the end of the day, one of the most powerful forces in DBMS is inertia. Just ask Oracle, whose 2Q15 financial results press release on 17-Dec-2014 noted that ?software updates and product support revenues drove nearly half of total company revenue.? Legacies are sticky ? if it works, people don?t take lightly to changing it. In all these cases, legacy products are not only holding their own, but finding new markets in the hands of large companies with loyal customer bases.

Don?t believe everything you read (unless, of course, we wrote it.)

Are Companies Really Worried About Digital Risk?

21 Dec 2014 15:24:11 Z

As the dust begins to settle on the Sony Pictures Entertainment data breach, we continue to see major threats to corporate digital assets become reality. And they are growing in both size and impact on corporations, well beyond customer personally identifiable information (PII). In Sony Pictures’ case, the breach extended to the very digital assets it produces. So, one has to wonder, are other companies really worried about digital risk?

Well, based on some recent survey data, I’d have to say – yes, they are worried. In fact, several weeks ago, I published an analysis of our annual Gartner IT Risk Management Survey and it contains some telling results. It showed that demands from board members and senior executives for IT risk management data increased dramatically in the past year. In 2013, only 46% of survey respondents noted that IT risk management data influenced board level decision making. However, in 2014, that percentage rose to a whopping 70% (see figure below).

gartnerdigitalriskboard

Source: Gartner (October 2014)

Our research is not alone. Boston Consulting Group also reports that 2014 has seen an increase of 126% in cyber attacks reported by companies, an increase of 83% in references to digital asset security in top broker research and an increase of 9% in worldwide spending in IT security.

So, the challenge for companies now is how to equip themselves for future threats and protect their most vital digital assets. That is also what the focus of our risk management research at Gartner is designed to address. In 2015, we will be investigating how companies are evolving their IT risk management programs to better manage these growing digital risks.

To learn more, visit gartner.com or click here to access more of my latest research.

Keep Calm and Transclude (Some Thoughts on Angular 2.0)

21 Dec 2014 15:24:11 Z

I don?t mean to sound unsympathetic. But since the JavaScript blogosphere erupted over AngularJS 2.0 design previews, I?ve been flooded with questions over the ?meaning? of the Angular ? fallout. This anti-hype is not deserved, in my opinion.

1. It?s a design preview. Angular 2.0 won?t be available for use for at least a year, and I?d bet longer. This means that Angular 1.3 will be actively supported for a likely 3 years from now, and that?s just officially. If some pundits are to be taken at their word, their forks will continue on for much longer. If you just love 1.3, I don?t think you?re gonna find yourself up a creek (without a paddle) anytime soon. Oh, and 1.4 is on the way, too.

2. It?s a major release increment. Some of the criticism seems to be about the design of 2.0, but just as much is aimed at the breaking changes and current lack of a migration path. This is kinda silly; major releases are expected to implement breaking changes. And frankly Angular?s design needs improvement ? ask any developer in day 4 of the Angular learning curve. If the dev team weren?t proposing breaking changes, they?d be stagnate and irrelevant within several years. And I?m pretty sure that there will be some upgrade guides out there, whether official or not. Also, see #1.

3. It?s a JavaScript framework. If you spend your days just coding with Angular, I can understand your frustration about some of the proposed design decisions. But this is the Web, and it moves quickly. We should be building lighter front ends. We should be prepared to reevaluate frameworks and libraries on a regular basis. Pace layering is not just a good idea, it?s the law. (Okay, that?s debatable. But it should be the law.) You need to continually evolve the front end ? I would argue that your front-end is the ?stuff? in Stewart Brand?s shearing layers of change. Backend developers should be so lucky.

4. The change won?t stop here. And it shouldn?t. For those of building rich Web applications, we don?t want to go back to 2005. Honest. And in 2020 we won?t want to return to 2015, I guarantee it. Hopefully you?re paying attention to what?s going on with Web Components and frameworks like Polymer. If some of us get our way, Custom Elements, HTML Imports, and Shadow DOM will become full standards and have native browser implementations within several years. If so, these will change how we build Web applications. Many of the frameworks out there today will be obsolete ? we won?t need them anymore. The Angular team needs to stay ahead of this curve, and they?re in a pretty good position to do so. Angular directives give teams a head start the philosophy behind Web Components, as does transclusion and other Angular concepts. Oh, and the Polymer team also lives at Google, which is, you know, convenient. They talk to each other and stuff. Other frameworks including Ember.js and Knockout have also tackled their own enhancements in this vein. ES6 continues to progress (72% support in the IE tech preview, wha?!).

5. Be glad you?re on the open platform. Every day I talk to teams with bigger problems. How to migrate off Flash or Flex or Silverlight? What frameworks to use to target both native iOS and Android platforms? How to get out from under IE8 ActiveX controls? What to do with those mainframe green screen applications? Your Angular 1.3 applications are lucky. They could be around for a very long time, whether or not you decide to upgrade to 2.0 (or 1.4) or not. And equally important, Angular skills will translate well to the next generation, whether it?s 2.0 or Web Components or both or something completely different. (Cuz be honest, that wasn?t easy to learn, was it?)

There?s no reason to flee from Angular at the moment, and there are many reasons to join the party if you?re building rich HTML5 apps. I?m glad the development team is pushing the envelope, rather than resting on their laurels. I believe they will carefully consider the feedback they?re getting from their users ? that?s part of the reason for presenting design previews. 2.0 might be great, or it might not be great. I?ll be excited to get my hands on it to find out.

Refer also to #1.

Who is the Government of North Korea?

21 Dec 2014 15:24:11 Z

There is so much talk and skepticism about the perpetrators of the Sony attack ? are they representing the North Korean government or are they a small band of crazy hackers?

The discussion makes me recall a dinner I had about a year ago with a respectable Chinese Factory owner when I asked him if reports about Chinese government espionage on U.S. corporations were truthful.

His response was telling ? how does one differentiate between the Chinese government and everyone else? Basically the government and other sectors blend together in China ? many companies and individuals are branches/arms/agents of the Chinese government. I imagine the same exact concept holds true in North Korea where pretty much every company and entity is state owned or state controlled, including the one ISP that the country has.

DBMS Legacies are Very Sticky

21 Dec 2014 15:24:11 Z

Donald Feinberg (@Brazingo) & Merv Adrian (@merv)

Every so often, there?s a wave of interest in the ?imminent retirement? of one or more legacy database management systems (DBMS). Usually, it?s because someone with very little knowledge of the actual use and distribution of the products becomes enthusiastic about someone?s sales pitch, or an anecdote or two. Sometimes it?s the result of a ?replacement? marketing campaign by a competitor. It takes longer than 40 years for DBMS technology to die, and for a (competing) marketer, it’s like the villain in a horror story who just keeps coming back. And so far, it?s usually as illusive- and as far off – as the ?death of the mainframe?.

Recently, a financial analyst report stated that in 2015, the industry would begin retiring Sybase products (owned now by SAP) and Informix (owned now by IBM). We and our colleagues have since had several inquiries about this and our response is simple: poppycock. DBMS market data, and our thousands of interactions with customers, do not support any such assertions.

Let?s start with Sybase, or specifically, SAP ASE and SAP IQ, acquired by SAP from Sybase in 2010. (Full disclosure: Merv worked at Sybase in the 1990s.)

Since its acquisition of Sybase, SAP has released several enhanced versions of both SAP ASE and SAP IQ (including recently in 2014), and there?s no reason to question its intent to continue development and support of both.

Generally, the customers using these products are happy, and are not looking to replace them. We receive a steady stream inquires from Gartner clients asking about them, which have not changed in character or in volume. It is true that customers ask the question, however the vendor’s intent is not questioned. They are not typically or disproportionally about removing these products, though we regularly get inquiries about replacing all the ?legacy? RDBMS offerings with new products.

SAP IQ is the oldest and most widely installed column-store DBMS on the market. It is used for both analytics and as a general purpose data warehouse; it?s also part of the SAP HANA infrastructure, used as a near-line storage engine for cooler data not required in-memory in SAP HANA.

SAP ASE has retained a sizable loyal customer base on Wall Street, where it is part of the infrastructure used for trading systems, and elsewhere. It?s been certified as a DBMS platform for SAP Applications for about two years, and its use there is growing: Gartner estimates over 6000 instances of SAP Applications using SAP ASE as a platform at the beginning of 2014.  [Edited Dec 19 to change number to 6000 - see below for comment from SAP]. That rate of growth for SAP ASE is actually faster than it had been in the 10 years before SAP acquired it – most likely because now SAP ASE is an alternative to Oracle, as a platform for SAP Applications.

Given the SAP sales force?s focus on SAP HANA, and the minimal marketing of SAP ASE and SAP IQ, we do understand how a misconception around the future of these products could happen. But it is just that ? a misconception.

What about Informix, acquired by IBM in 2001? Over a decade later, it remains an integral part of an IBM information management portfolio that includes three primary DBMSs ? DB2IMS and Informix, and newer entrants such as Cloudant. IBM has continued to release new enhanced versions of Informix since the acquisition; for example it has recently added JSON support with MongoDB JSON Drivers. Due to the implementation of embedded indexes, Informix is a good choice for audio and video indexing. Finally, the number of IBM Informix customers has continued to increase and its user base is very loyal, with one the largest and most active User Groups.

IBM positions Informix for three primary use cases:

  • High-speed processing in verticals like retail (point of sale systems) and manufacturing
  • Time-series DBMS ? one of its primary features, and a ?timely? one
  • The Internet of Things, where its high-speed ingest capabilities and small footprint are well-suited

So, it?s our opinion that the report referenced above is erroneous, and is not based in fact. At the end of the day, one of the most powerful forces in DBMS is inertia. Just ask Oracle, whose 2Q15 financial results press release on 17-Dec-2014 noted that ?software updates and product support revenues drove nearly half of total company revenue.? Legacies are sticky ? if it works, people don?t take lightly to changing it. In all these cases, legacy products are not only holding their own, but finding new markets in the hands of large companies with loyal customer bases.

Don?t believe everything you read (unless, of course, we wrote it.)

Digital Marketing Under the Microscope

21 Dec 2014 15:24:11 Z

Ah, the memories. The early days of digital marketing — say, way back in 2011 — when the CMO could give the website a refresh, tell the media agency to extend the TV flight with some banner ads on Yahoo and a homepage takeover, make sure the intern threw some thoughts up on the Facebook tab and the brand terms were covered on Google. That pretty much checked the “digital marketing” box, which was good enough for the rest of the C-Suite.

Not any more. Drive up to today: Digital accelerated from 10% to 25% and more of the marketing budget, according to our research, and CMOs are facing the one-two jib-jab of having to reshape their organization, realign budgets and priorities, and equip the team to answer much more pointed questions from the higher-ups, including shareholders.

There can be no doubt digital marketing is getting its time in the laser beam. Our Gartner for Marketing Leaders calendar this week (client access here) addresses how the digital CMO is adapting, based on our interviews with both consumer and business-to-business marketing leaders.

As they hustle to reshape the marketing organization for the 21st century, these leaders confirmed to us that:

  • Marketing is expected to deliver strategic growth ideas, as well as tactical discipline
  • Senior roles are being created to manage customer experience end-to-end
  • “Build versus buy?” is an increasingly ardent question
  • Organization design is being rethought, even revamped
  • Digital marketing is expected to collaborate more effectively both inside and outside the organization

Organizational pressures show up in spending priorities and marketing budgets. Gartner’s 2015 CMO Spend Survey showed that in addition to enjoying support from the organization, for the most part, marketing spend patterns surfaced greater investment in the customer experience and a ramp in the trend blurring the line between traditional and digital marketing. We are nearing the moment when it’s all just “marketing.”

Our analysis also validated a trend many of our clients had been reporting anecdotally: namely, that marketing is tasked with a greater responsibility for managing capital budgets and stewarding tech buying decisions. In fact, the vast majority of our respondents reported that marketing had a dedicated capex budget, and that marketing owned or shared a P&L, earning revenue from digital commerce, advertising sales, selling data, and so on.

Even more striking is the prominence of customer experience as a differentiator. Our research shows that a majority of companies plan to compete primarily on the basis of customer experience by 2016. While a capacious term passing many points of the marketing compass, customer experience itself commands a healthy fifth of the marketing budget today. This finding backs up marketers’ strategic priority to “connect with customers better.”

Meanwhile, the organization has had to adapt to serve these demands, priorities, and a quickening pace. My colleagues Richard Fouts and Jake Sorofman have published eloquent research on the need for organizations to evaluate modern cross-disciplinary techniques like agile and self-directed teams. Part of the newly prized agility is a willingness to redefine roles — for example, elevating the importance of an under-recognized function, like user experience design, with a higher title and pay; or bypassing internal red-tape and contracting outside agencies or talent, or even crowdsourcing functions like content creation.

Despite admiring the very real challenges at hand, our research sounds a hopeful note, showing that many marketers in various industries and contexts, both business-to-consumer and business-to-business, large- and larger-size, more and less advanced — that many of them are facing the challenges with an eagerness to experiment, learn and support the organization’s targets.

The old days are over, and a lot of marketers are simply saying: Happy New Year!

Open-Sourced Advanced Analytics is increasing...

21 Dec 2014 15:24:11 Z

Just one week after Gartner’s European Symposium, I attended yet another IT conference in Barcelona, the Strata + Hadoop World, which finally prompted me to post this last blog entry for 2014. What really caught my attention there was the frequency of encounters, where Python and R were mentioned. Now Strata, of course – has some “population bias”, but already many of my previous encounters with end-users (also at the predictive analytics world in Berlin), indicate the same trend:  A lot of innovative data scientists really favor open source components (especially Python and R) in their advanced analytics stack. I hear this a lot, even from the most advanced of our clients… One department head, leading a dozen data scientists at one of the top retailers, gave me the following rationale:

“I would be paying about $5 million just in annual maintenance, if I stuck with vendor xxx … imagine how many gifted data scientists I can buy for that money (?) …  and by the way I did hire them and they all use a combination of R and Python”.

This is an argument very much worth considering. For us Garter this means, we will even more scrutinize all vendors regarding their value-add (e.g. debugging, security layers, model management, and decision management). For vendors, this must mean to better open up their platforms to R and Python and similar platforms. Just offering an “R integration” will not be good enough for 2015, vendors! Try to differentiate yourself a bit better than that.

I am really looking forward to your opinions and comments. Please post them here or send them to me directly via email.

Wishing all a great festive season break…

 

best regards

Alex Linden

 

 

 

 

Gartner 2015 Predictions: Consumer Goods Firms Step Forward on the Path to Digital Business

21 Dec 2014 15:24:11 Z

As 2014 draws to a close, my Gartner  colleagues Dale Hagemeyer. Steven Steutermann,  and I took time this fall to develop our 2015 predictions for the consumer goods industry.   Together, we cover sales, marketing, and supply chain technology topics and trends important to CIOs,  IT and Supply Chain leaders in the global consumer goods industry. In this year’s report Predicts 2015: Consumer Goods Manufacturing Steps Forward on the Path to Digital Business, we provide predictions covering CPG acquisition of software companies, direct-to-consumer fulfillment in supply chain to support E Commerce, predicting on-shelf availability issues,  and  what happens when intelligent things become customers.

We believe consumer goods manufacturers will need to keep their eye on the development of digital business ? the creation of new business designs from the blurring of the physical and digital worlds. This is beyond digitization, which is a mere mimicking of analog-based business models. For the consumer goods industry, we expect digital business will usher in a new era of growth from the convergence of people, business and intelligent things, creating new revenue opportunities, new risks and new opportunities to engage retailers, consumers and supply chain vendors. These predictions envision a world in which digital business takes root in the consumer goods industry, creating opportunities for all consumers, manufacturers and retailers.

As my colleague Mike Shanler so eloquently put in his blog last year, we don?t take the predictions process lightly.  Many of these have deep impacts on client strategy and investments, so we put a lot of thought into them before putting them to print. Whether you agree with the predictions or not, they are a great way to generate discussion on possibilities ? an essential element of any strategic planning process.

Best wishes and see you in 2015!

 

Bimodal Business leads to Bimodal IT

21 Dec 2014 15:24:11 Z

In a recent blog post, I discussed the concept of bimodal IT as a way for CEOs and CIOs to manage the digital divide between what IT provides and what the enterprise needs right now. Bimodal IT has been a Gartner focus for our clients the last 18 months

In bimodal IT, mode 1 is traditional IT, where systems must be reliable, predictable and safe. Mode 2 is non-sequential, emphasizing innovation, agility and speed. It’s all about the flow in mode two, more ?fluid? than solid, like a startup.

CIOs need to function at two speeds to seize the opportunity in digital business, and nearly half of them are currently doing so. In a Gartner survey, 45 percent of CIOs state they currently have a second fast mode of operation and, by 2017 we predict that 75 percent of IT organizations will have a bimodal capability.

The digital divide continues to widen

The ability of executive teams to forecast the future of their competitive environments, markets and value chains is diminishing, almost on a quarterly basis. These same teams are under pressure to find ways to mitigate stakeholder risks and exploit business opportunities. Meanwhile, disruptive digital trends crowd the horizon. The consumerization of IT, the Nexus of Forces (social, mobile, cloud, information and analytics) and the Internet of Things have triggered explosive digital demand.

All of this leads to the digital divide widening between what the IT organization can provide and what the enterprise wants and needs. This is why bimodal IT is a powerful capability for addressing these issues. It entails operating the IT organization in two modes that are comprehensive and coherent, but deeply different, while exploiting the benefits of both.

The risk of not responding; Shadow IT

Internal pressures are forcing the hand of the IT organization. The growth in shadow IT is a manifestation of users’ desire to control their technological destiny, of their growing confidence in their ability to do so and of their dissatisfaction with the IT organization’s current methods. Shadow IT is the long-standing phenomenon that is currently growing at a rapid rate, whereby unofficial investment in IT occurs around the enterprise often “under the radar.” This is not merely decentralized IT. Shadow IT sidesteps the designated IT organization to derive value from technology. This is what I referred to in my previous blog post about business units acting like start-ups in your own organization.

If IT doesn’t act, the digital void will be filled anyway

The problem with shadow IT for CEOs and CIOs is not just that activities are happening outside the direct control of a formal IT organization. It?s that in acting independently, shadow IT often makes a huge unmanageable mess leading to integration, security and technical debt problems down the road.

CEOs need to know that is in the interest of the enterprise, not just the CIO and their team, for IT to be a full-fledged partner in the creation of the digital enterprise and bimodal IT is the way to achieve it. Indeed, this may be the only way to avoid a future filled with digital detritus that could impact the enterprise’s competitiveness in the near future

Sony Sued For Losing Unprotectable Data

21 Dec 2014 15:24:11 Z

The gist of a new lawsuit against Sony is that by failing to adequately protect social security numbers, they have doomed former employees to a lifetime of credit fraud.

“The class-action suit was filed by Michael Corona and Christina Mathis, both of whom had their social security numbers made public after a hacking group calling itself Guardians of Peace dumped studio documents, employee information and salary charts online….Corona was an employee from 2004 to 2007. The suit says that he has so far spent $700 for a year of identity theft protection.” Sony hit with Class Action Lawsuit by ex-Employees

It boggles the mind to think that every current and former Sony employee immediately needs to pony up $300-700 to hire a personal financial security guard.  I don’t actually believe that they do, but if you are trying to generate sympathy for a lawsuit, why not claim that anyone ever employed by Sony has just lost hundreds of dollars?

All other ramifications of the Sony hack aside, as in the hack against JP Morgan Chase reported several months ago, the form of data in question in this lawsuit consists of a phone book. The personal data stolen from Sony that is referred to in this lawsuit consists of personal identifiers.   Names and addresses are matters of public record and can never be protected.  Social Security Numbers (SSNs) are theoretically not matters of public record, but the awkward truth is that so many different parties use them that they can never be protected from somebody who is highly motivated to obtain them.

Motivation is the systemic problem here: if possession of someone’s SSN is sufficient information to commit credit fraud, then widespread credit fraud is inevitable.  The CISO asked to protect names and SSNs has been handed a sysyphean task that can never be successful.  The banking, card processing, and legal systems have inadvertently contributed to an unsustainable situation in which individuals have no choice but to share their SSN and name with countless commercial and governmental organizations.  Those organizations have no choice but to maintain multiple copies of that personal data, and often must share it externally in support of business process.  If that data can be exploited to commit fraud, it is inevitable that people will be motivated to steal it.

Further security failures are inevitable. No organization handling large amounts of personal data can ever hope to fully protect it from theft. All they can do is try to encourage the crooks to attack some other organization instead.

If Sony employees actually do need to pay money out of pocket to protect themselves, it should be viewed as evidence of a systemic problem with the legal structure of our financial system.  The problem isn’t that SSNs are not being adequately protected–the problem is that they are being inappropriately used.  Instead of pretending that we can actually protect personal information, we need to better protect consumers from creditors that are not adequately authenticating the individuals they give credit to.

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Nuestra edición de navidad de Estación Play te regala más juegos

21 Dec 2014 15:34:23 Z

Navidad y fin de año son excusas perfectas para adelantar nuestra edición de Estación Play. Como el 2014 está despidiéndose, en esta corta edición recuperamos las noticias más importantes del año que hicieron emocionar a los fanáticos del universo PlayStation, no sin antes ponernos en la temática navideña y presentar un nuevo concurso. Si quieres […]